Comments for Admiring Light http://admiringlight.com/blog Photography Reviews, Photos, News and Musings Sat, 24 Jan 2015 19:22:01 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Comment on Review: Sony A7II by Jordan Steele http://admiringlight.com/blog/review-sony-a7ii/#comment-220604 Sat, 24 Jan 2015 19:22:01 +0000 http://admiringlight.com/blog/?p=4482#comment-220604 I have two main tripods I use. My main pod that gets brought on any serious shoots is a pair of Induro carbon fiber CX213 legs with a Photo Clam PC-36 ballhead. The legs are discontinued, but here is the current set. While you don’t need a super heavy duty set of tripod legs for these cameras, you still need a good set, and you need a set that is the right height to work with you comfortably. I prefer having a tripod where the height is about 8 inches below my height when extended, WITHOUT extending the center column. This gives a stable view, that once you add the ballhead and the camera, will get you eye level without hunching. Of course, most of my work is done lower than that, but height is set based on the best angle for composition…but having the ability to go full height without compromising stability by extending a center column is key to me. A good set of legs also makes sense for better operation in the field and durability.

I’ve had that tripod for about 6 years now and it’s in great shape. The ballhead is a personal choice too, but I prefer heads that have separate friction control (to avoid flopping upon release). A good head will have zero movement after tightening the ball. I also prefer using a clamp with the Arca-Swiss style quick release. I get custom plates for the camera which ensures the absolute best stability, which minimizes vibration and helps eliminate droop after setting the composition. The arca-swiss style release is also extremely secure and very fast to release, plus it allows for some adjustment in position by sliding along the dovetail. The carbon fiber legs are well worth the cost to me, keeping the overall package fairly light and easy to carry in the field. (it’s 2 pounds lighter than my old Aluminum manfrotto that I still have, but only rarely use, and even then only indoors, though that’s still a very good tripod).

My second tripod is my travel tripod, which is a MeFoto RoadTrip. This is a great little tripod with integral ball head. The head uses an Arca-Swiss style clamp, and the head is of good, but not exceptional quality (It holds solid, but lacks dedicated friction control. The tripod folds up very small, and can easily fit inside an airline carry on. I keep this in my car at all times so I always have a tripod with me should I see something and need a tripod. When extended, it isn’t super tall, but it’s tall enough to be useful for most situations. It also can go quite low to the ground. It’s a well-made tripod and solid, though the 5 section legs do make it a tripod that won’t be good for large cameras (not a problem for me) or in heavy wind. Still, it’s quite solid given the size and great for travel. I used it when I was in Germany for Photokina, and have used it for many other shoots around town. They make this in carbon fiber too, which would make it even lighter, but I have the aluminum version for this tripod. One of the legs can also be unscrewed and attached to the center column to turn it into a monopod, which is pretty nice. (I have a Manfrotto monopod with an A/S clamp that I generally use when I need a monopod, but that’s usually only when I’m shooting golf with my big gun).

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Comment on “Full Frame Equivalence” and Why It Doesn’t Matter by Dave Thornton http://admiringlight.com/blog/full-frame-equivalence-and-why-it-doesnt-matter/#comment-220601 Sat, 24 Jan 2015 18:41:59 +0000 http://admiringlight.com/blog/?p=1541#comment-220601 Found your site while researching “Full frame Equivalence”. A really informative and easy to understand article! I have bookmarked your site and forwarded the link to several fellow photographers here in the UK.

Dave

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Comment on Review: Sony A7II by Craig http://admiringlight.com/blog/review-sony-a7ii/#comment-220598 Sat, 24 Jan 2015 16:56:48 +0000 http://admiringlight.com/blog/?p=4482#comment-220598 Jordan,
I wonder if you’d be open to giving your suggestions of any portable tripods you’ve come across for the smaller mirror-less cameras that you like and would recommend for consideration? Reading your reviews it appears you do a lot of your work from tripods, and your deep into the mirror-less size cameras. Of course a lot of the appeal of mirror-less cameras is the portability and light weight. So with one’s tripod for those camera options, we’d also be grappling with that weight versus height and rigidity trade off. What do you think?

I really appreciate your reviews. I recently rented the Fuji XT1 and expected to fall in love with it, but wasn’t won over. So, i’m now looking harder at the Sony APSC models, and your reviews are really helping inform that decision.

Craig

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Comment on Review: Sony A7II by Admiring Light A7II Review | Asher's Photo Blog http://admiringlight.com/blog/review-sony-a7ii/#comment-220391 Wed, 21 Jan 2015 21:27:03 +0000 http://admiringlight.com/blog/?p=4482#comment-220391 […] You can read the review here: http://admiringlight.com/blog/review-sony-a7ii/ […]

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Comment on Sony A7 II vs. Sony A6000 – Landscape Use by Mark http://admiringlight.com/blog/sony-a7-ii-vs-sony-a6000-landscape-use/#comment-220383 Wed, 21 Jan 2015 18:09:11 +0000 http://admiringlight.com/blog/?p=4529#comment-220383 Check this out: guesstheformat (dot) com.

Like Jean, I was wondering about DR and also high ISO, as I do a lot of sunsets and astro. Jean has a point here, but his hyperbole doesn’t help him. I’m sure the FF cams outperform their APS-C siblings when you’re really beating up the images in post. Nevertheless, the a6000 has produced some stunning photos for me since I purchased it a few months ago. You’re probably right that the difference is smaller than people make it out to be.

In the end it is all about justification: Can I justify spending $3-4k on a FF body and a lens or two? The answer for me is ‘no’. At this point in time my photography is not a profitable proposition, nor am I a particularly rich person. Perhaps that will change, but I don’t see myself upgrading any time soon. Life is about trade-offs. It’s not a big deal. Just spend less time reading blogs and more time shooting. I’m happy where I am with my gear (even though I’d appreciate it if Sony could show some more love for the E mount’s lens lineup!). Looking at the comparisons above I am confident I made the right choice in purchasing the a6000.

Thanks for your article!

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Comment on Sony A7 II vs. Sony A6000 – Landscape Use by Chuck http://admiringlight.com/blog/sony-a7-ii-vs-sony-a6000-landscape-use/#comment-220381 Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:14:45 +0000 http://admiringlight.com/blog/?p=4529#comment-220381 Very nice test, I wonder how the current best APSC sensor from Samsung NX1 28mp BSI stacks up to the A7ii. The NX1 can take the Samyang 12mm f2 lens as well, it’s clear here the Samyang 12mm is an excellent lens (sharper than the Zeiss Touit 12mm in another test I saw). I wager there is a chance this combo can best the A7ii in resolution.

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Comment on Sony A7 II vs. Sony A6000 – Landscape Use by GJS http://admiringlight.com/blog/sony-a7-ii-vs-sony-a6000-landscape-use/#comment-220380 Wed, 21 Jan 2015 15:55:40 +0000 http://admiringlight.com/blog/?p=4529#comment-220380 You do have a point about the 7D. I never have been misty eyed and filled with joy when I look at 100% crops of my 7D shots. But looking at photos from a normal point of view, I’m rarely disappointed. Then I purchased an Olympus E-M5, which to my eye had slightly better image quality in a much smaller package so the Canon gear has been mostly sitting on the shelf ever since. Another reason the 7D sits is because most of my photography is done when I’m either traveling or hiking which was the main reason I bought the E-M5.

I’m fairly heavily invested in Canon EF-S lens along with u4/3 lens. Sony’s prices for E mount lens aren’t quiet as stratospheric for their high end compared to Canon, but they aren’t exactly cheap compared to quality u4/3. If I’m going to get into a new camera system, it’s going to be FF so the A6000’s out of the question. I’ve been disappointed with Canon’s lack of innovation / vision lately which is why I’m looking at the Sony A7.

So what I should do is have a Canon gear fire sale and put the cash towards a new FF Sony. But then I would want to start buying new lens and before I know it I’ve spent thousands of dollars on a new system when I could have put the money into a couple more quality u4/3 lens and an awesome trip to Belize.

Thanks for the advice and reading through my ramblings.

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Comment on Sony A7 II vs. Sony A6000 – Landscape Use by Dogg http://admiringlight.com/blog/sony-a7-ii-vs-sony-a6000-landscape-use/#comment-220374 Wed, 21 Jan 2015 13:28:34 +0000 http://admiringlight.com/blog/?p=4529#comment-220374 The Sony A6000 has much better IQ than Canon’s 7D. You can’t just take the A6000’s performance and compare then to your 7D’s. There are a lot of videos on Youtube comparing the 7D with the A6000. The 7D’s look really blurry, even with very good lenses. Have a look on your own.

So I’d say, if you only have the 7D with the 15-85mm and are willing to replace it with a A7, you could have a closer look at the A6000. If you already have a complete lens line-up, stick with it. In general, if you don’t want to use legacy MF lenses, native e-mount lenses are a big problem for e-mount. They have some great, small primes (35/1.8, 50/1.8, 24/1.8) with very good image quality. You can also use some very good FE mount lenses (Loxia, 55/1.8) … But there’re not many more options. 3rd party supply is very low (there’re 2 cheap but sharp Sigma primes) and most zooms have bad image quality even when they’re quite expensive.

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Comment on Sony A7 II vs. Sony A6000 – Landscape Use by Earl Robicheaux http://admiringlight.com/blog/sony-a7-ii-vs-sony-a6000-landscape-use/#comment-220339 Wed, 21 Jan 2015 02:34:37 +0000 http://admiringlight.com/blog/?p=4529#comment-220339 For the comment I made on the A7 Mark II review, I took images with the A7 Mark II f/7.1, ISO 100 on a tripod with the 24-70mm f/4 lens at 50mm (shutter release with electronic front curtain shutter) and then took the same image with the a6000 using the Voightlander 35mm f/1.4 Nokton, f/7.1, ISO 100. To my eye, (at 2:1 ant 3:1) the image results were virtually identical in the highlights and in the shadows. I personally attribute this result to the file compression that Sony uses as I would otherwise expect the full frame sensor to have a slightly better dynamic range and produce better shadow results. However, the specific compression used throws away more data in the shadows, greatly reducing the FF advantage. So my point is, why spend the money for the full frame body and heavier lenses when the results are no better than with the less expensive body and lenses. BTW, I am “very” impressed with the Sony Vario 16-70mm lens and the Sony 10-18mm lens…..Final comment, I also shot the same image as described above with the Nikon D600 with a Zeiss 50mm f/2 lens with better detail in the shadows and all around smoother image.

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Comment on Review: Sony A7II by Earl Robicheaux http://admiringlight.com/blog/review-sony-a7ii/#comment-220335 Wed, 21 Jan 2015 01:44:49 +0000 http://admiringlight.com/blog/?p=4482#comment-220335 Signed the petition. See my comment on the a6000 vs A7 Mark II

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