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Mar 25

Review: Fujifilm X-T20

Conclusion

Pros

  • Solidly constructed body
  • Excellent control layout, with dedicated dials and programmable buttons
  • Clear, detailed and low-lag EVF
  • Excellent autofocus in both single shot and continuous mode, with wide AF point coverage and customizable continuous AF modes
  • Fully featured, with Wi-Fi connectivity, a built-in intervalometer, art filters, panorama stitching, multiple exposures and more
  • 24 Megapixel sensor has excellent dynamic range, great detail and reasonably low noise for an APS-C sensor
  • 8 fps burst rate with AF tracking and a deep buffer
  • Great manual focus aids
  • 4K Video
  • Excellent rear touch screen
  • Can charge through the USB port
  • Great electronic shutter capabilities, as fast as 1/32,000 second.
  • Excellent value

Cons

  • The grip is quite small, and combined with an imperfect rear thumb grip placement makes the camera handle awkwardly with larger lenses
  • EVF is smaller than some of the competition
  • Bracketing at +/- 2 stops for 3 shots only
  • Buttons on the top of the camera are a bit small and mushy.

The cons list above is short, and for good reason: the X-T20 is a fantastic camera. Much like the X-T10 was very much an X-T1 in a smaller package, the X-T20 really feels like a small X-T2. There are a several features the flagship X-T2 has that the X-T20 doesn’t, such as dual card slots, a dual tilting screen, weathersealing, a larger EVF and the focus joystick; however, nearly everything else is the same with the X-T20.  It has the same great sensor, the same excellent autofocus capabilities, plus a few firsts on Fuji cameras such as face detection with PDAF and auto shutter speed selection in Auto ISO, though both features will be coming to the X-T2 via firmware shortly. It also has largely the same control layout, the same general feature set and the same excellent processor and responsiveness. The new touch screen also takes away a bit of the sting of losing the focus stick.

When compared to the X-T10, the X-T20 is an excellent upgrade.  The flaws that were present on the X-T10 have almost all been fixed with the T20, save for some of the ergonomic concerns.  The biggest downfall of the X-T10 was the laughably small buffer during burst shooting, but the X-T20 has a very deep buffer that even exceeds that of the X-T1. In all, the X-T20 is a truly excellent camera for a very reasonable price. For those using this as their main body, the Fuji metal hand grip will be a fairly essential accessory, but even with that extra purchase, the value with this camera is excellent.

For those who want a chunkier body or need the larger EVF, weathersealing or dual card slots, the X-T2 will be one to go for, but for almost everyone else, the X-T20 is going to be awfully hard to pass up. For my own shooting, the X-T20 has replaced the X-T1 as my primary Fuji body. It’s an excellent camera and is highly recommended.

Image Samples

Click on an image to enlarge.

March Sunrise - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 @ f/11,

March Sunrise – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 @ f/11, ISO 200 – 3 Shot HDR (bracket +/- 2 stops)

Cedar Falls - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 @

Cedar Falls – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 @ f/13, 2s, ISO 200

Indian Run Falls - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF

Indian Run Falls – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 @ f/11, 1.3s, ISO 200

Stained Glass - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 @

Stained Glass – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 @ 86mm, f/3.9, 1/160s, ISO 200

Wasteland - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8

Wasteland – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 @ 20.5mm, f/11, 1/150s, ISO 200

Playtime - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 23mm f/2 @ f/2,

Playtime – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 23mm f/2 @ f/2, 1/60s, ISO 2000

Indian Run Falls - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 @

Indian Run Falls – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 @ f/11, 1/2s, ISO 200

Hidden Falls, Hocking Hills State Park - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 @

Hidden Falls, Hocking Hills State Park – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 @ 22.3mm, f/11, 3s, ISO 200

Sundial - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 50mm f/2 @ f/2,

Sundial – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 50mm f/2 @ f/2,1/100s, ISO 4000

Portrait - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 50mm f/2 @ f/2,

Portrait – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 50mm f/2 @ f/2, 1/340s, ISO 200

In the Window - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 23mm f/2 @

In the Window – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 23mm f/2 @ f/4, 1/800s, ISO 200

ATM - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 23mm f/2 @

ATM – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 23mm f/2 @ f/2, 1/60s, ISO 1250

Grass - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 50mm f/2 @ f/2,

Grass – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 50mm f/2 @ f/2, 1/2500s, ISO 200

Cedar Falls Runoff - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 @

Cedar Falls Runoff – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 @ 18mm, f/11, 2.5s, ISO 200

Knowlton Curves - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 50mm f/2 @

Knowlton Curves – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 50mm f/2 @ f/5.6, 1/750s, ISO 200

Sunrise Blossoms - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 35mm f/2 @ f/2,

Sunrise Blossoms – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 35mm f/2 @ f/2, 1/600s, ISO 200

Sunrise Silhouette - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 @

Sunrise Silhouette – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 @ 200mm, f/8, 1/640s, ISO 200

Columbus at Sunset - Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF

Columbus at Sunset – Fujifilm X-T20 with Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 @ 18mm, f/8, ISO 200 (3 shot HDR, +/- 2 stop bracketing)

If you enjoyed this review, check out my other reviews in the Review Index.

 

 

About the author

Jordan Steele

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Admiring Light; Photographer; Electrical Engineer and Dad

22 comments

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  1. schralp

    I wanted this to be my next Fuji camera and was able to tolerate the change from the EVF of the X-T1. However, i found that I could not hold the camera with any lens besides my 35 f/1.4 without pressing the right button on the D-pad with the base of my thumb. The only solution was to lock them but that lockout takes a few seconds and toggling on/off to move the focus point was a disaster. Ideally, the focus point movement would be tied to a joystick and the D-pad locked independently. Alternatively, the touchscreen could be active when using the EVF (it works great when using the LCD and I really love that functionality and the haptics in my X70) but of course that brings up another set of issues I would expect; moving the focus point with your nose. Even with my smallest lens (the aforementioned 35) I struggled to keep from pushing the buttons with the base of my thumb. I guess that means it’s the X-T2 for me or stick with the X-T1….

    1. Jordan Steele

      Interesting. I can’t say I’ve ever accidentally hit that button when holding the camera. I will say that the add-on grip helps quite a bit in the handling of the camera…it is finicky due to its size without the grip. Still, the X-T2 is definitely going to feel better in the hand, especially if you have bigger hands.

  2. Stefano

    Thank You Jordan for your detailed review. I really appreciate your work.
    What you say about the EVF will maybe help me solving my doubts: I’m going to upgrade from XT1 and I’m not so happy to spend 1600 euros for the XT2. I think that the XT20 will fit most of my needs. My biggest concern was the smaller EVF indeed.

    I do hope that a future firmware update will allow the touch screen to be used for changing the focus point while looking into the EVF.
    I also hope that some of the features just announced for the next XT2 firmware update (up to 15 minutes exposure in “T” mode in particular) will be soon available for the XT20 as well.

    1. Jordan Steele

      It is definitely notably smaller. If you’ve used any of the X-E series, it’s the same apparent size, though you need to be closer to the optics to see the whole thing…some people don’t like that, I actually don’t mind at all because I position my eye that distance anyway, and it feels a bit more immersive that way. The only way to tell is to try yourself.

      1. Stefano

        Thank you very much.
        To me, the smaller size and direct usb charging (perfect features for a travel and hiking/trekking camera) are major pros for the XT-20.

        You wrote that the X-T20 has replaced the X-T1 as your primary Fuji body.
        Eventually, was the XT20 a worthy upgrade from the X-T1 for you, despite the smaller EVF and worse grip?

        Thank you!

        1. Jordan Steele

          I think so. The EVF is a fairly easy adjustment to be honest. Since I review lots of cameras, I’m used to jumping around different EVFs, so while the drop in magnification is certainly noticeable, you get accustomed to the smaller finder pretty quickly. It’s also the same resolution, so you’re not giving up any detail, just size.

          The extra detail and better AF performance were the big things for me, so in that realm I like it. If I shot exclusively Fuji, I probably would have sprung for the X-T2, but I shoot both Fuji and Sony primarily, so I couldn’t justify the extra cost, and I think it’s the right choice for me.

  3. Craig

    Jordan,

    Always appreciate your reviews for the practical and detailed considerations of a camera’s merits. Plus your photos are awesome. Really appreciate you using with a variety of lenses to show the possibilities. My X-T20 has been on back order for three weeks. Oye vey the anticipation!

    Craig

    1. Jordan Steele

      Thanks! Hope you enjoy it like I have!

  4. andi

    Hi Jordan
    I shoot with a XT-1 now, and I’m quite satisfied.
    If you compare the same pictures from the XT-1 and the XT-20 :
    is it a tiny or quite a huge difference?

    Andi

    1. Jordan Steele

      It’s not a huge difference. Noise wise, they’re fairly close…perhaps a half stop difference to the X-T20. The X-T20 definitely has more detail available, and while visible in a print, it’s not a massive difference. I did a comparison of the X-Pro2 to the A7 II, and at the end, to the X-T1 (for noise), but you can see the crops there. Image quality is the same for the X-T20 and the X-Pro2. http://admiringlight.com/blog/fuji-x-pro-2-vs-sony-a7-ii-noise-comparison/

      For the detail difference between them, see this crop from that test: http://www.admiringlight.com/2017/xt1-pro2.jpg

  5. Tiago

    Jordan
    Great pratical review.
    Inhave following your site for 2 years and this is my first post
    I have bought my xt-20 weeks two weeks ago and really like the camera. Coming from a XXD canon camera is really nice to have such high quality pictures (iso 12800 acros is really usefull for small prints and very film like), nice af tracking , nice video with film simullations, wonderful film simulations in a very small package
    I really agree with your pros and cons list: my main cons is the function button on the top plate is really mushy. The first i used it I was not sure if it was ok or Broken
    Two questions:
    What noise reduction settings do you Prefer?
    How would you classify shooting with manual portrait primes on it (with a nikon 85 mm)?
    Thank you and keep up the excelent work

    1. Jordan Steele

      I shoot RAW for the most part, so the noise reduction doesn’t get used unless I am using the the in-camera RAW conversion to share. Generally I leave it on -1, as I generally prefer a more detailed result with some noise than a smoothed image.

      I’d definitely recommend the grip for shooting with larger primes, but other than that, it works great. I think the clear EVF with focus peaking + magnification makes locking in on the focus point fairly straightforward, and certainly easier than on a DSLR.

  6. Jim Murray

    Hi Jordan, just found your site and and find it very informative.

    Have you any experience using the Thumb rest/grip made by Lensmate?
    They are not inexpensive but do look very well thought out and made.

    I do find the camera to be very compact, one of the attractions but do agree that holding it is cramped and also find myself hitting the four way switch with the heel of my thumb.

    Just wondering if the Lensmate thumb grip has worked for anyone.

  7. Jerome Froese

    I tried to like the X-T20 but found the grip to make this probably the most uncomfortable camera I’ve held in a very very long time. I tried it for 2 weeks but ended up returning it along with the 3 lenses I bought with it in exchange for a Sony A7II. Much more comfortable in hand for me.

  8. Gary

    Excellent review, very thorough.

    What wrist strap is that on your X-T20? It looks like a must have.

    Please let us know.

    Thank you.

    1. Jordan Steele

      That’s from Gordy’s Camera Straps. I have one for my Fuji and one for my Sony A7 II, and I love them. They are slightly stiff when you first get them, and then they break in over time and become very soft and supple. The one in this picture I’ve had for around 4 years and it’s holding up great.

  9. dunsun

    Hey Jordan,

    I really love your practical reviews.

    Please could you tell me if you had any troubles with auto white balance on this camera ?
    I’m thinking about getting this camera (I shoot m43 + Fuji X-A1).Fuji X-A1 produces excellent out of camera jpegs.
    From what I have seen auto white balance is not right (greenish tint) on this camera. For me it’s a very important criteria since I’m partly color blind and always fight with WB setting.
    This greenish tint is mentioned in many reviews (for example):
    http://mirrorlesscomparison.com/fujifilm-vs-olympus/omd-em1-mark-ii-vs-fuji-xt2/#Colours-white-balance-and-JPG-settings

    Regards

    1. Jordan Steele

      I can’t say that I noticed a tint in any of my shooting. Of course, I didn’t notice a green tint in my shooting with the X-T2 either. That said, I will often adjust white balance to taste in RAW, which may not be particularly useful for you, given the colorblindness, so I apologize I may not be of more help!

  10. Red Slater

    Great review. I have ordered one to replace my X-T10. I am quite satisfied with the 16M sensor, and am getting the T20 for other enhancements. My question is, if I switch the IMAGE QUALITY from FINE to NORMAL, so I get a 16M JPEG instead of a 24 JPEG, will the image match the 16M JPEG from the X-T10 in quality and print size?

  11. simo

    Hi jordan
    what about the gird artefact (inside the purple flare) with the x-t20.
    I readt that x-t2 and x-pro2 have the problem, did you see that problem with x-t20.

  12. Justine

    Which camera would you choose? The XT20 or the Oly EM10II? Curious to know :)

  13. Jonathan

    Terrific review and photos, thank you. I am seriously contemplating buying one. May I ask what software you use for converting X-trans raw files? Do you have a recommendation?

    Thank you
    Jonahan

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